Taming your anger dragon: Compassion-focused therapy script

Dragons are powerful creatures, representing the strength and intensity of our anger. While this fire can sometimes cause harm, we can learn to work with our “anger dragons” in a more constructive way. This visualisation exercise talks you through the process of observing your ‘anger dragon’, reflecting on our values, and responding with care. The purpose of this exercise is to help a client develop a healthier relationship with their intense emotions and instead use them to support personal growth.

 

 

Download taming your anger dragon script

 

 

 


About the taming your anger dragon: compassion-focused therapy (CFT) script

By approaching our anger with compassion and understanding its deeper needs, we can harness the “dragon’s” energy to promote connection and well-being, rather than destruction. The exercise is as follows:

  • Getting settled: Begin by gently closing your eyes. If it feels comfortable, you may place your hands over your eyes. Take a deep breath in, allowing your body to relax. With each exhale, release any tension you may be holding.
  • Arriving in the present: Bring your full awareness to the present moment. Notice the sensations in your body, the sounds surrounding you, and the temperature of the air. Ground yourself in the here and now.
  • Connecting with your anger dragon: Imagine yourself standing outside a cave, the dwelling place of your anger dragon. Notice the red glow emanating from the cave, a sign that your dragon is feeling agitated. Remember, this is merely a metaphor, representing your angry thoughts and feelings. They do not define you; they are temporary experiences.
  • Creating space: Reflect on recent events that triggered your anger or upset. As you recollect these moments, observe your anger dragon emerging from the cave in response. Instead of resisting or avoiding your dragon, practice acceptance and willingness to acknowledge its presence, without judgment.
  • Observing your dragon: Visualise your anger dragon standing before you. Take note of its size, intensity, and expression. However, remember that you are the observer, separate from the dragon itself. You are the conscious awareness capable of holding space for these experiences.
  • Connecting with your values: Inquire within, asking your dragon what it truly needs – perhaps to be heard, validated, or expressed. Imagine responding to your dragon with compassion, offering what it requires. This connects you to your personal values surrounding self-care.
  • Next steps: Once your dragon feels soothed, allow it to retreat back into the cave. Remind yourself that you can revisit this process whenever your anger dragon stirs. You have the ability to care for your emotional well-being. When you feel ready, open your eyes and re-engage with the world from a centered, values-driven place.

 

Upcoming live training

Compassion-focused therapy for anger featured image
8 hours (8 CE credits)
Compassion-focused therapy for anger

Russell Kolts

Read more
ACT for relationships featured image
3 hours (3 CE credits)
ACT for relationships

Dr Russ Harris

Read more
Mastering ACT featured image
Two 3 hour sessions (6 CE credits)
Mastering ACT

Robyn Walser

Read more

Knowledge hub

Related to your search/filter:

Emotional efficacy and ACT featured image
Emotional efficacy and ACT

What do we mean by emotional efficacy? Emotional efficacy refers to an individual’s capacity to effectively ...

Read more
Imposter syndrome and ACT featured image
Imposter syndrome and ACT

What is imposter syndrome? Imposter syndrome is a psychological phenomenon where individuals develop a deep do ...

Read more
Psychological flexibility featured image
Psychological flexibility

Embracing change for a meaningful life What is psychological flexibility? Psychological flexibility is a power ...

Read more

Knowledge hub

On-demand training

Related to your search/filter:

An introduction to the ACT model featured image
An introduction to the ACT model

Dr Joe Oliver

Read more
ACT skills for working with chronic pain featured image
ACT skills for working with chronic pain

Dr Kristy Potter

Read more
ACT for physical health problems featured image
ACT for physical health problems

Dr Ray Owen

Read more

On-demand training

Blog: Latest insights into ACT

Related to your search/filter:

The impact of low emotional efficacy on wellbeing and performance featured image
The impact of low emotional efficacy on wellbeing and performance

Emotional efficacy plays a crucial role in our overall wellbeing and performance. When individuals struggle wi ...

Read more
The four big myths about love and how ACT can help featured image
The four big myths about love and how ACT can help

We’ve all grown up surrounded by idealised depictions of love – from the fairytales we read as childre ...

Read more
Re-frame, re-train and re-connect with Hazel Anderson-Turner featured image
Re-frame, re-train and re-connect with Hazel Anderson-Turner

Ahead of her upcoming course “ACTivate your coaching for beginners: A practical introduction to using AC ...

Read more

Blog: Latest insights into ACT

Resource hub

Related to your search/filter:

ACT values cards featured image
ACT values cards

Our new values card have arrived! ACT conversation cards are a fantastic therapeutic tool for working with val ...

Read more
The power of letting go - script featured image
The power of letting go - script

In this script we look at the experience of Sam, a fictional client. Sam’s experience with anxiety and f ...

Read more
Emotion efficacy therapy (EET)- reading list featured image
Emotion efficacy therapy (EET)- reading list

Emotion efficacy training (EET) is an approach that aims to help individuals develop the skills and strategies ...

Read more

Resource hub

Join our newsletter to be the first to receive updates on our upcoming events, exclusive free resources and other valuable goodies. Sign up now and embark on your ACT journey with us!

You can unsubscribe at anytime. Read our full privacy policy here: Privacy policy